Blade Runner: Shooting “Tears in the Rain”

As Blade Runner 2049 is released and before watching the next instalment I wanted to revisit this scene once again, which counts amongst one of the most iconic moment’s in cinematic history and that still stands the test of time. In a recent interview, Rutger Hauer discussed how the scene “Tears in Rain” came together to conclude the film and his character Roy’s journey. The collaborative environment that Ridley Scott created enabled performer’s to bring more input to the character’s and in this case the dialogue. Rutger was looking for what Roy felt and his experience of the world where he was being hunted for being an android, a place that eventually leaves him isolated and alone by the end of the movie. “Spirit, heart and soul” for the androids final moment’s was what he wanted,  Ridley agreed to take on whatever “you can add complexity, wickedness” as long he liked it, Rutger…

The Social Horror Genre – Get Out

“Get Out” is a paranoid thriller that like the best conspiracy thrillers,  disturbs the audience with its expert use of unsettling images and situations throughout that fill you with horror. The film starts out like a classic comedy-drama, in the vain of Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner, in which a young African-American man meets his Caucasian girlfriend’s parents for the first time. But the boyfriend, Chris, notices something strange about all the black people he encounters in the idyllic community and learns of the more sinister designs the family have in mind for him. Financed by Blumhouse, it was exactly the kind of off-beat, a zeitgeist-hitting film that could be spun into a horror hit—provided it could be made cheaply. The company keeps budgets low by offering deferred payments, hence taking bigger creative gambles with stories that may never get made as Jorden Peel identifies himself. “You want to hear a cool story? The…